Valour

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Valour

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Canada’s military valour decorations, namely, the Victoria Cross, the Star of Military Valour, and the Medal of Military Valour, were created by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, on 1 January 1993. All the decorations may be awarded posthumously.

The Victoria Cross is awarded for the most conspicuous bravery, a daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.

The Star of Military Valour is awarded for distinguished or valiant service in the presence of the enemy.

The Medal of Military Valour is awarded for an act of valour or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

Star of Military Valour

Star of Military Valour

Medal of Military Valour

Medal of Military Valour

The Mention in Dispatches was created to recognize members of the Canadian Forces on active service and other individuals working with or in conjunction with the Canadian Forces for valiant conduct, devotion to duty, or other distinguished service. Recipients are entitled to wear a bronze oak leaf on the appropriate campaign or service medal ribbon. Like the military valour decorations, the Mention in Dispatches may be awarded posthumously.

On 29 September 2010, Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michalle Jean, then-Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada, announced the awarding of three Medals of Military Valour to members of the Canadian Forces who displayed gallantry and devotion to duty in combat. The recipients of these valour decorations, along other service members being honoured with 21 Meritorious Service Decorations, will be invited to receive their decorations at a ceremony to be held at Rideau Hall at a later date. The ranks of those honoured reflect the substantive ranks held by the recipients at the time of the respective combat incidents.

Medal of Military Valour

  1. Warrant Officer Michael William Jackson
  2. Master Corporal Jeremy Joseph James Leblanc
  3. Master Corporal Paul Alexander Munroe

 

Warrant Officer Michael William Jackson, MMV, CD
Vancouver and Abbotsford, British Columbia
Master Corporal Paul Alexander Munroe, MMV, CD
Stonewall and Swan River, Manitoba,
Medal of Military Valour

In the midst of a three-hour battle in Afghanistan on August 19, 2006, Warrant Officer Jackson and Master Corporal Munroes platoon was forced to conduct a withdrawal while under enemy fire. Fully exposed to the violence of the enemy, these soldiers risked their lives to coordinate the safe movement of personnel and damaged vehicles. Their heroic actions under constant fire enabled the platoon to regroup and continue the fight, while denying the enemy an opportunity to capture and make use of stricken Canadian equipment.


Master Corporal Jeremy Joseph James Leblanc, MMV
Coalhurst, Alberta
Medal of Military Valour

On January 31, 2009, Corporal Anderson came under small arms fire with his joint Canadian-Afghan patrol in Zhari District, Afghanistan. During the initial stages of the ambush, an Afghan soldier was severely wounded and lay exposed to the relentless attack. As the battle raged around him, Corporal Anderson exposed himself to enemy fire while he and the patrol medic attempted to move the soldier to safety. With no cover, he immediately began to provide first aid despite enemy rounds impacting inches from his position. Corporal Anderson’s selfless disregard for his personal safety saved the wounded soldier’s life.

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